He Shall Be the Stability of Your Times

He Shall Be the Stability of Your Times

Just watching the nightly news is enough to make you want to crawl into bed and pull up the covers.

If you listen to the scaremongers, the economy is poised to crash. Foreclosures and delinquencies are everywhere. The gap between rich and poor continues to expand. Half of all households receives a government handout of some kind, but has less than a month of expenses in savings. The $20 trillion deficit, a number so high it defies all metaphors, is a looming issue. The chaos of a new election will soon be upon us.

The geopolitical landscape is no better. Europe is struggling, threatening the stability of the Western Hemisphere. China and Russia are rattling swords on various fronts. There are dictators abroad, armies on the march, and suffering and unrest everywhere.

Nature isn’t cooperating either. Volcanos erupt in Hawaii forcing people from their homes, the San Andreas fault is shaking, crazy weather patterns are setting up a new hurricane season.

And even if none of these world events were occurring, there would still be sickness and death that invade one family at a time. Even if the world is ok, if your own job is depressing, your kids are struggling, your home is burning, then your world is upside down.

That’s why Isaiah’s message to the faithful remnant is as important today as it was in his day, when the nation of Israel was experiencing economic collapse, political turmoil, and military invasion.

The Lord is exalted, for He dwells on high; He has filled Zion with justice and righteousness, And He will be the stability of your times, A wealth of salvation, wisdom and knowledge; The fear of the Lord is his treasure (33:5-6).

 

The Stability of Your Times

In times like these, everything is unsure (1 Tim. 6:17)—markets, homes, cars, gas prices, health, futures, and even basic security. But God is still a rock of salvation, a pillar of strength. “He will be the stability of your times.”

Christians need not lose hope. Not because our physical fortunes will necessarily be any better. Often, the righteous suffer splashover consequences of the sins of society. But Christians have a different foundation that never moves. Zion is strong, even if America grows weak. “He will be the stability of your times.”

His word. “Take My yoke upon you and learn from Me, for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls” (Matt. 11:28–30). Abiding by the principles of God’s inspired word often helps prevent trouble. Even when trouble inevitably comes, the Bible reminds us of better things.

His salvation. “Do not fear those who kill the body but are unable to kill the soul” (Matt. 10:28). “What will it profit a man if he gains the whole world and forfeits his soul?” (Matt. 16:26). Ultimately, who cares whether or not we achieve great financial success, whether we live to a young or old age, whether we live in a big house or small house, whether we drive a new car or jalopy? The salvation of our souls is the only thing that really matters.

His love and concern. “He who did not spare His own Son, but delivered Him over for us all, how will He not also with Him freely give us all things?” (Romans 8:32). “He Himself has said, ‘I will never desert you, nor will I ever forsake you,’ so that we may confidently say, ‘The Lord is my helper, I will not be afraid. What will man do to me?’ ” (Hebrews 13:5–6).

His support. “No temptation has overtaken you but such as is common to man; and God is faithful, who will not allow you to be tempted beyond what you are able” (1 Cor. 10:13).

His church and heaven. “Since we receive a kingdom which cannot be shaken, let us show gratitude, by which we may offer to God an acceptable service with reverence and awe” (Heb. 12:28–29).

His peace. “Be anxious for nothing, but in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known to God. And the peace of God, which surpasses all comprehension, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus” (Philippians 4:6–7).                    —John Guzzetta